The Trial Today: June 19

Here’s a sample of what occurred on this day in the Lincoln conspiracy trial:

  • Closing arguments began on the part of the defense
  • John Clampitt read the long absent Reverdy Johnson’s argument against the jurisdiction of the commission
  • David Herold’s defense was read by one of the court reporters because his lawyer, Frederick Stone, was absent
  • Mary Surratt was overcome by the heat and was placed in the doorway of the courtroom to get more air
  • Walter Cox read his closing argument for Michael O’Laughlen which also included a defense of Samuel Arnold
  • Julia Wilbur, an anti-slavery relief worker, visited the courtroom and sketched the layout in her diary

The June 19, 1865 entry for the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators is now released and has more information. Please click here to access it. You can also access it through The Trial homepage.


Throughout May and June of 2020, I am publishing a day by day chronology of the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators. This includes almost daily posts announcing the release of what happened at the conspiracy trial 155 years ago. For more information about the creation of this project please click here.

Categories: History | Tags: | Leave a comment

BoothieBarn is now LincolnConspirators.com!

I’m very happy to share this big announcement with all of you. From now on, this website has a brand new name and web address! Welcome to LincolnConspirators.com!

LincolnConspirators.com is the perfect name for the content you’ve come to expect from this website. Under LincolnConspirators.com you will continue to learn about John Wilkes Booth, Lewis Powell, David Herold, George Atzerodt, Mary Surratt, Dr. Samuel Mudd, Samuel Arnold, Michael O’Laughlen, Edman Spangler, John Surratt, and the countless other people who were involved, in some way, in the story of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination. All the materials that this site provides – from its image galleries, maps, videos, projects, posts, and pages – are still here and easily accessible under the LincolnConspirators.com domain. Links, shortcuts, and favorites you might have under the old name will continue to work for the foreseeable future and will automatically redirect you.


I’m sure many of you are curious as to why I’ve decided to change the name of the site. To be honest, I’ve been unhappy with the name BoothieBarn for a while. When I started this blog in 2012, it was just a place for me to put up little tidbits of knowledge that I had learned while researching and interacting with experts in the field of Lincoln’s assassination. Back then, there were only a couple of online sites where people who focused on studying Lincoln’s death could share information. As a subject, Lincoln’s assassination has not always been accepted as a true form of Lincoln research. In fact, the term “Boothie” originated with more traditional Lincoln scholars as a disparaging moniker towards those who wasted their time studying John Wilkes Booth and his conspirators. Many Lincoln scholars found it unfathomable, or even sacrilegious, that anyone would spend more than the bare minimum amount of time learning about the man who killed our country’s greatest president. An understandable division arose between the Lincoln scholars and those they deemed “Boothies”. As a result of this division, most of our modern understanding of John Wilkes Booth and his plots against Lincoln has actually come from the work of amateur history buffs and researchers, rather than academic Lincoln scholars. When, as a college student, I started doing my first real research into the Lincoln assassination, I was surprised to find the Lincoln assassination field was populated by a welcoming group of everyday people who were willing to share information without hesitation. There was no pretense or snobbery, only generosity. When the time came to decide on the name to give my fledging blog, I made sure to include “Boothie” as a symbol of appreciation to the group of people who taught me, supported me, and the only ones I thought would ever want to read it. The latter half of the site’s name was much less thought out. I figured John Wilkes Booth was killed in a barn and, well, I like alliteration. Hence, BoothieBarn was born.

While I still appreciate and love the community of “Boothies” who continue to support me and share so much, the truth is, we’re no longer the isolated or disparaged group we once were. In the last few years, I’ve seen interest in Lincoln’s assassination grow and grow. The support of this site and the hundreds of hits I get everyday shows me that people are coming to understand that the study of John Wilkes Booth and his conspirators are legitimate parts of Lincoln’s legacy. Among the greatest honors of my life has been to speak at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library about Booth and his conspirators. Lincoln scholars, and the general public, are increasingly understanding that learning about Booth is not at all the same as agreeing with him. John Wilkes Booth was, and will always be, one of the greatest villains in our history. He was a racist, white supremacist coward who shot an unarmed man in the back of the head. Booth is not a man to admire, look up to, or to venerate in anyway. Yet, he is still a crucial part of Lincoln’s story. The study of Lincoln’s assassination is the study of one of the darker moments in our history. But sometimes the darker parts of history can shed the most light on the past. While I seek to understand Booth and those he interacted with, I will never support or advocate for the beliefs that he, or the Confederacy that he supported, stood for.

By changing this website’s name, I’m hoping to encourage more study into this important, yet tragic part of Lincoln’s legacy. This website has grown so much more beyond a haven for me and my colleagues. I want to continue to develop this website to add more educational resources like the recent Trial of the Conspirators project. As an educator myself, I want teachers to be able to send their students here to learn more about the events and people surrounding April 14, 1865. The name BoothieBarn requires too much explanation and lacks professionalism. While I will miss the alliteration of the old name, LincolnConspirators.com perfectly defines the content this site provides.

I’ve changed a lot from from the recent college graduate who decided to start up his own niche history blog. I’ve done a lot of growing to become a more understanding, compassionate, and empathetic person. Many things have come and gone in my life and changed me in immeasurable ways. Yet even through these periods of personal growth and reflection, my interest in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln has remained constant. It’s long overdue that my website change to reflect who I am and what I want to present to the world. I am in the process of getting my Master’s in American History. Even though I know I have done a lot of good work as BoothieBarn, I want to be able to say that I am a “real” historian, a professional. I’m proud of every piece I research and write on this website, and so I want it to have a name that I can be equally proud of.

I will continue to own the old BoothieBarn domain for the foreseeable future, so all of your old links will work for the time being. If you find an old link on social media or elsewhere, it will still work and just redirect you to the same page under the LincolnConspirators.com domain. For those of you who follow me on Twitter, I have changed my Twitter handle to @LinConspirators. However, if you are currently on Twitter and following me, you will still be following me after the change.

I’ve also updated the email address connected to this site to reflect the new name. Feel free to contact me at admin@lincolnconspirators.com with any questions, comments, or concerns you may have.

I’ve been honored by the over one million of you who have read, commented, and supported my efforts. This site has grown beyond what I ever imagined. I will continue to provide the same content that you have to come to expect, now under the better and more professional name, LincolnConspirators.com.

Thank you for continuing to join me on this journey!

Sincerely,

Dave Taylor

Categories: News | Tags: , , | 26 Comments

The Trial Today: June 17

Here’s a sample of what occurred on this day in the Lincoln conspiracy trial:

  • The court did not meet due to the continued illness of Col. Tompkins
  • Lewis Powell was taken out of his cell and examined by Dr. John Gray
  • Concerns over Edman Spangler’s wandering mind granted him some time outside in the prison yard
  • It was decided that all of the conspirators should be given some time outdoors each day

The June 17, 1865 entry for the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators is now released and has more information. Please click here to access it. You can also access it through The Trial homepage.


Throughout May and June of 2020, I am publishing a day by day chronology of the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators. This includes almost daily posts announcing the release of what happened at the conspiracy trial 155 years ago. For more information about the creation of this project please click here.

Categories: History | Tags: | Leave a comment

The Trial Today: June 16

Here’s a sample of what occurred on this day in the Lincoln conspiracy trial:

  • One of the military commissioners was absent from the courtroom so an orderly was sent to check on him
  • The much debated “Lon” letter (pictured above) was once again the subject of testimony and discussion
  • Testimony was heard regarding funds utilized by agents of the Confederate Secret Service
  • David Herold “celebrated” his 23rd birthday

The June 16, 1865 entry for the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators is now released and has more information. Please click here to access it. You can also access it through The Trial homepage.


Throughout May and June of 2020, I am publishing a day by day chronology of the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators. This includes almost daily posts announcing the release of what happened at the conspiracy trial 155 years ago. For more information about the creation of this project please click here.

Categories: History | Tags: | Leave a comment

The Trial Today: June 15

Here’s a sample of what occurred on this day in the Lincoln conspiracy trial:

  • The court did not meet today in order to give the defense time to work on their closing arguments
  • Some of the commission members met at Mathew Brady’s photography studio to have their photographs taken.

The June 15, 1865 entry for the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators is now released and has more information. Please click here to access it. You can also access it through The Trial homepage.


Throughout May and June of 2020, I am publishing a day by day chronology of the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators. This includes almost daily posts announcing the release of what happened at the conspiracy trial 155 years ago. For more information about the creation of this project please click here.

Categories: History | Tags: | 3 Comments

The Trial Today: June 14

Here’s a sample of what occurred on this day in the Lincoln conspiracy trial:

  • William Doster concluded his case for Lewis Powell
  • Four doctors, including the one who cared for Lewis Powell during his imprisonment, examined Lewis Powell and testified about his sanity
  • Judge Advocate General Holt suggested the defense attorneys begin the process of presenting their closing arguments in the following days
  • Thomas Ewing, lawyer for Dr. Mudd, Samuel Arnold and Edman Spangler, challenged the language used in the charge and specification against the conspirators

The June 14, 1865 entry for the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators is now released and has more information. Please click here to access it. You can also access it through The Trial homepage.


Throughout May and June of 2020, I am publishing a day by day chronology of the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators. This includes almost daily posts announcing the release of what happened at the conspiracy trial 155 years ago. For more information about the creation of this project please click here.

Categories: History | Tags: | Leave a comment

The Trial Today: June 13

Here’s a sample of what occurred on this day in the Lincoln conspiracy trial:

  • There was more debate over one of the dubious letters entered into evidence
  • A break was taken so that Lewis Powell could be examined by a physician to judge his mental health
  • Samuel Arnold visited with his father in the courtroom
  • Two people formerly enslaved by Mrs. Surratt testified on her behalf
  • Frederick Aiken cross-examined John M. Lloyd, one of the government’s main witnesses against Mrs. Surratt
  • Maj. Eckert, Chief of the War Department Telegraph office, took the stand for a fifth day, the most of any witness
  • Edman Spangler’s defense was reopened by Thomas Ewing as he recalled one of Spangler’s coworkers, John DeBonay
  • Frederick Aiken announced his case for Mrs. Surratt was complete

The June 13, 1865 entry for the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators is now released and has more information. Please click here to access it. You can also access it through The Trial homepage.


Throughout May and June of 2020, I am publishing a day by day chronology of the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators. This includes almost daily posts announcing the release of what happened at the conspiracy trial 155 years ago. For more information about the creation of this project please click here.

Categories: History | Tags: | Leave a comment

The Trial Today: June 12

Here’s a sample of what occurred on this day in the Lincoln conspiracy trial:

  • Two defense witnesses recounted how Lewis Powell saved the lives of Union soldiers in December of 1864
  • One of Michael O’Laughlen’s friends reiterated that O’Laughlen never got close to Edwin Stanton’s home and was partying with the group during almost the entirety of April 13th and 14th
  • Frederick Aiken, Mrs. Surratt’s attorney, announced that he had traveled into Southern Maryland and found additional witnesses he wished to call but were not present on this day
  • The 1864 explosion at a Union headquarters in City Point, Virginia was found to be a result of a Confederate plot
  • The prosecution attempted to restore the beleaguered reputation of witness Marcus Norton
  • Several of the male conspirators entered the courtroom with hair cuts and shaved faces

The June 12, 1865 entry for the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators is now released and has more information. Please click here to access it. You can also access it through The Trial homepage.


Throughout May and June of 2020, I am publishing a day by day chronology of the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators. This includes almost daily posts announcing the release of what happened at the conspiracy trial 155 years ago. For more information about the creation of this project please click here.

Categories: History | Tags: | 1 Comment

Blog at WordPress.com.